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Nineteen Eighty-One.

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karpovkorchnoi1981Karpov-Korchnoi 1981

The 1981 World Championship Match was to be played in the same venue as the Candidates’  Final between Korchnoi and Hübner, the Italian town of Meran (north of Italy, region of Trentino-Adigio.The place gives also name to the famous Meran Variation in the Semislav after the game Tartakower-Rubinstein played there in 1924. That part of the old Europe is very interesting historically speaking ). After that match fiasco, I guess the organizers would expect to cash in on a bigger stake. The events which had taken place three years before still cast their shadows over Meran ’81 :Korchnoi’s family was still in the Soviet Union : the Soviet authorities refusing to allow them to leave the country, and the rivalry between the two K’s had not diminished. But the match turned out to be a sort of anticlimax… The Soviet delegation included many people: Chess helpers, Karpov’s personal cook, medical staff, physical helper,translators and diplomats,as well as A. Roshal and V. Baturinsky, and bodyguards.  (Any Soviet World Champion had access to any sort of help.  Karpov had many “consultants” and I could mention his all-time helper Zaitsev, and Yuri  Balashov, for instance. In Meran Tal and Polugaevsky were side by side with him too. On those days it was very difficult to clearly determine “who were doing what” in Soviet official Chess camps) . Korchnoi’s seconds were Stean, Seirawan,Gutman and Ivanov. He was also accompanied by a lawyer, A. Brodbeck and a Chief of Delegation, E. Sztein. Journalist present mention also the  presence of a bodyguard… Those were hard days…The match was scheduled to beguin on October 1st, the winner would have to win six games with draws not counting.

All in all, one thing was immediately clear: Karpov was still becoming stronger while Korchnoi seemed to be slowly declining, at least to maintain such intensity against a terrific opponent as Karpov and for so many years . The first games of the event showed that Viktor was not in the match: after the first five games, the score was 3-0 for Karpov. Korchnoi managed to win the sixth game but after the tenth game the score was 4-1 in Karpov’s favour. Some drawn games followed, Korchnoi won the 13th game but lost the 14th and leaned over the abyss much to the organizers’ desperation who saw that a quick resolution of the match would finish with their financial expectations (understandably, under such conditions a very long match can be catastrophic but if it is too sort and one-sided the financial situation for the sponsors is the same: absolute disaster!). I have read that the organizers  managed to express their worries to Karpov who somewhat reassured them (!)… Be that as it may, three more games ended in a draw but the 18th one ,played on November 19th was adjourned with a winning position for Karpov. The game was not resumed and Karpov renewed his World Champion title for three more years.

After the 1978 match I was looking forward this new event. On the one hand , my sympathy was with Karpov. But I still had the secret hope of witnessing another magnificent struggle with the scores dangling from one side to another. That was not to happen. But the match taught me a lot of Chess strategy, especially the first and the ninth games. In the first game, Karpov played superbly using one of his favourite weapons: the hanging Pawns. In the ninth game, he showed another of his specialties: the fight against the isolated Queen Pawn. The fifth game was also of great technical interest since Karpov managed to draw as Black -a Pawn down- in a typical King +Rook + four Pawns vs. King + Rook + three Pawns  all in the K-side. Nevertheless and in retrospect, the feeling left by that match was  one of dullness. Nothing to do with what was going to come: the immense clash Karpov-Kasparov in the following years. In a sort of gesture to the gallery, Karpov even played the Italian Opening in the 8th and the 10th games. Two draws. Karpov himself in his notes to the games says that the Italian Game had last appeared in a World Championship Match in 1896 (Lasker-Steinitz return match).

W.: V. Korchnoi (0)

B.: A. Karpov (1)

Meran, Italy 1981.- World Championship Match (1)

1. c4, e6/ 2. Nc3, d5/ 3. d4, Be7/ 4. Nf3, Nf6/ 5. Bg5, h6/ 6. Bh4, 0-0/ 7. e3, b6/ 8. Rc1, Bb7/ 9. Be2, Nbd7/10.cxd5, exd5/ 11. 0-0, c5/12. dxc5, bxc5/ 13. Qc2, Rc8/ 14. Rfd1, Qb6/ 15. Qb1, Rfd8/ 16. Rc2, Qe6/ 17. Bg3, Nh5/18. Rcd2, Nxg3/ 19. hxg3, Nf6/ 20. Qc2, g6/ 21. Qa4, a6/  22. Bd3, Kg7/ 23. Bb1, Qb6/ 24. a3, d4!/ 25.Ne2, dxe3/26. fxe3, c4!/ 27. Ned4, Qc7/ 28. Nh4, Qe5/ 29. Kh1, Kg8/ 30. Ndf3, Qxg3/ 31. Rxd8, Bxd8/ 32. Qb4, Be4!/33. Bxe4, Nxe4/34. Rd4, Nf2+/ 35. Kg1, Nd3/ 36. Qb7, Rb8/ 37. Qd7, Bc7/ 38. Kh1, Rxb2/ 39. Rxd3, cxd3/ 40. Qxd3, Qd6/ 41. Qe4, Qd1+/ 42. Ng1, Qd6/ 43. Nhf3, Rb5/ The game was adjourned here. Karpov sealed a move but Korchnoi, after a while, stopped definitively the clocks. White resigned.

W.: V. Korchnoi (0)

B.: A. Karpov (1)

Meran, Italy 1981. World Championship Match (9)

1. c4, e6/ 2. Nc3, d5/ 3. d4, Be7/ 4. Nf3, Nf6/ 5. Bg5, h6/ 6. Bh4, 0-0/ 7. Rc1 dxc4 (TN according to Karpov)/ 8. e3, c5/ 9. Bxc4, cxd4/ 10. exd4, Nc6/ 11. 0-0, Nh5!/ 12. Bxe7, Nxe7/ 13. Bb3, Nf6/ 14. Ne5, Bd7/ 15. Qe2, Rc8/ 16. Ne4, Nxe4/ 17. Qxe4, Bc6!/ 18. Nxc6, Rxc6/ 19. Rc3, Qd6/ 20. g3,Rd8/ 21. Rd1, Rb6/ 22. Qe1, Qd7/ 23. Rcd3, Rd6/ 24. Qe4, Qc6/ 25. Qf4, Nd5/ 26. Qd2, Qb6/ 27. Bxd5, Rxd5/ 28. Rb3, Qc6/ 29. Qc3, Qd7/ 30. f4, b6/31. Rb4, b5/ 32. a4, bxa4/ 33. Qa3, a5/ 34. Rxa4, Qb5 /35. Rd2, e5/ 36. fxe5, Rxe5/ 37. Qa1, Qe8!!/ 38. dxe5, Rxd2/ 39. Rxa5, Qc6/ 40. Ra8+, Kh7/ 41. Qb1+, g6/ 42. Qf1, Qc5+/ 43. Kh1, Qd5+/ White resigned.

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Anatoly Karpov and A Team Championship.

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I consider Karpov as , perhaps , the best ever chessplayer in the history of Chess. It is not only his personal record but also all his contributions to our royal game.

My hero’s  last feat has been his victory in the Cap d’Adge KO event which took place between October 26th and November 3rd. Karpov’s victory is his 171st first place in tournament play. No other chessplayer has achieved the same if my memory serves me right.

Many things could be written about him and his approach to Chess, but my advice is to get one of the many collection of games played by him and study them. And if you wish to understand how he sees Chess, there is a book written by him and Matzukievich (the original German edition has the title of  “Stellungsbeurteilung und Plan”. In Spanish it was translated as “The Strategy in Chess” = “La Estrategia en el Ajedrez”). In this book the authors deal with the matter of how to assess positions and design plans.

In my opinion, Karpov’s career can be divided into three (other people may prefer four) periods : from 1966 to 1975. From 1975 to 1986 and from 1986  up till today. If the reader think otherwise, it may be absolutely correct too.

I have tried to collect everything about Karpov and the result is an enormous amount of paper in the shape of books, thousands of newspaper cuttings, hundreds of Chess magazine pages and now , Internet archives. I have written many articles for Chess magazines, bulletins, etc. , and I have filled notebooks with lots of analysis : about his games and his style. I did this first because I began to do it at an early age. And then because I was fed up with so many biassed interpretations, mistakes in analysis and stupid commonplaces written to fill up space. So, in Chess, apart from books by certain exceptional authors, try also to get the originals by the very player involved.

Karpov has written a lot of Chess books  and has analysed many of his games in them.  To me, the best ones are those which appeared in the late 70’s of the past century, analysing games from the first part of his career. But this is a matter of taste.

W.: Ivanchuk (0)

B.: Karpov (1)

Trophee Karpov KO. Cap d’Adge 2012

1. Nf3 , Nf6 2. g3, d5 3. Bg2, c6  4. c4, g6 5. b3, Bg7 6. Bb2 0-0 7. d3, Bg4  8. Nbd2, Nbd7  9. 0-0 , Re8  10. h3, Bxf3  11. Nxf3, e5  12. e3, Qa5  13. cd5, cd5  14. Qd2, Qxd2  15. Nxd2, e4  16. de4, Nxe4  17. Nxe4, de4  18. Rad1, Nc5  19. Ba3, Rac8  20. Rc1, b6  21. Rc4, f5  22. Rfc1,a5  23. Bxc5, bc5  24. Rxc5, Rxc5  25. Rxc5, Re5  26. Rc7, Bf8  27. Ra7, Be7  28. Bf1, Kg7  29. Bc4, Kf6  30. h4, h5  31. Kf1, Kg7  32. Ra6, g5  33. hg5, Bxg5  34. a4, h4  35. Bb5, hg3  36. Rxa5 , gf2  37. Kxf2 , Rd5  38. Ke2, f4  39. Ra7, Kf6  40. ef4, Bxf4  41. Bd7, Bd6  42. a5. Ke5  and White resigned.

The following game is a masterpiece: it deserves close study.

W.: Karpov (1)

B.: Klovans (0)

Daugavpils 1971

1. e4 e5 2. Nf3  Nc6  3. Bb5  a6  4. Bxc6 dc6  5. 0-0  f6  6. d4  ed4  7. Nxd4  Ne7   8. Be3  Ng6  9. Nd2  Bd6  10. c3  0-0  11. Qb3  Kh8  12. N5  Bxf5  13.  ef5  Nh4  14. Qxb7  Qd7  15.   Qb3  Nxf5  16. Nc4  Rfe8  17. Rad1  Rab8  18. Qc2  Rb5  19. Rfe1  Nxe3  20. Nxe3  Rbe5  21. g3  Qe6  22. b3  Kg8  23. Ng2  Re2  24. Rxe2  Qxe2  25. Rd2  Qf3  26. Kf1  re5  27. Qd3  Qxd3  28. Rxd3  Kf7  29. Ne3  Ke6  30 Nc4  Rh5  31. h4  Bc5  32. Nb2  Rf5  33. Rd2  h5  34. Nd3  Bd6  35. Re2  Kd7  36. Re3  g5  37. c4  c5  38. Kg2  c6  39. f3  gh4  40. gh4  Bf4  41, re4  Bd6  42. f4 and Black resigned.

On the other hand,  the following game is from the Spanish Team Championship ( León , Spain November 2012) , with a wealth of GMs like:  Ponomariov, van Weli, Edouard, Anish Giri, P. Harikrishna, Cheparinov, M. Marin, Hamdouchi, Bauer, Sargissian, Ganguly, Kovalyov, Alina L’Ami, etc. ,their Spanish GM fellow companions  and several IMs too. The winner was Sestao Chess Team, a team from the Basque Country in northern Spain.

I liked the play of the Indian GMs and have chosen the following game between Anish Giri and his fellow countryman  S. Ganguly: Play through it to see the curious and instructive Rook endgame. When perhaps many people would agree to a draw, Giri keeps on playing and…

W.: S. Ganguly  (2610) (0)

B.: Anish Giri  (2730) (1)

Spanish Team Championship 2012.

1. d4, Nf6 2. c4  g6  3. Nc3  d5  4. cd5  Nxd5  5. e4  Nxc3  6. bc3  Bg7  7. Bc4  c5  8. Ne2  Nc6  9. Be3  0-0  10. 0-0  b6  11. dc5  Qc7  12. Nd4  Ne5  13. Nb5  Qb8  14. Be2  bc5  15. Rb1  a6  16. Nd4  Qc7  17. Nb3  Rd8  18. Qc2  c4  19. Nc5  Nd3  20. Nxd3  cd3  21. Bxd3  Qxc3 22. Qxc3  Bxc3  23. Bc4  Bd7  24. Rfc1  Bf6  25. Kf1  Bb5  26. Be2  Bd4  27. Bxd4  Rxd4  28. Bxb5  ab5  29. Rc2  Rxe4  30. Rxb5  Ra7  31. g3  Rea4 32. Rbb2  g5  33. Kg2  Kg7  34. Re2  f6  3. Re6  Kf7  36. Rbe2  h5  37. h3  h4  38. g4  Ra3  39. Kh2  R7a6  40. Rxa6 Rxa6  41.Kg2  Ra3  42. Rb2  e5  43. Rb7  Ke6  44. Rb6  Kf7  45. Rb7  Kg6  46. Rb2  Ra6  47. Re2  Kf7  48. Rd2  Ke6  49. Rb2  Kd5  50. Rd2  Ke4  51, Rb2  Ra4  52. Re2  Kd5  53. Rd2  Ke6  54. Rb2  Ra6  55. Rd2  f5  56. gf5  Kxf5  57. f3  Ra3  58. Re2  Ke6  59. Rd2  Kf6  60. Rb2  Ke7  61. Rd2  Ke6  62. Kf2  e4  63. fe4  Rxh3  64. Rd5  Kf6  65. a4  Ra3  66. e5  Ke6  67. Rd4  Kxe5  68. Rb4  Kf5  69. Rc4  Kg6  70. Kg2  Kh5  , and White resigned.

QuestChess.

Written by QChess

November 15, 2012 at 8:01 am

Posted in CHESS, Chess games, Karpov, Personal opinion

Tagged with ,

Blockade.

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The clear understanding of strategical themes through careful study of games is of  paramount importance to play good Chess.  To me, one of the most important books to read is Nimzowitsch’s  “Chess Praxis”. One of the concepts exposed there is that of blockade. (He also wrote a booklet dealing with the matter: “Blockade”, but I find that the treatment he gives to it in the former is much better).  Nimzowitsch connects blockade to two other ideas formulated by him: “prophylaxis” and “restraint”. (“Prophylaxis” understood as prevention of the opponent’s counterplay/aka “preventive thinking” and “restraint” understood as control and prevention -related to advance of Pawns, freeing manoeuvres, etc.)

He used to say that the process in a typical game was something like: RESTRAINT-BLOCKADE-DESTRUCTION . Handling a blockade game is difficult. Some of the concepts expressed by Nimzowitsch are difficult to grasp. I understand that when he speaks of “blockade” that implies much more than a blockaded center. In fact, I believe that a typical “blockade” game implies to put under a blokade network as much territory as possible: either the whole board or at least the center+ one of the wins. Nimzowitsch himself stated that it was very difficult to protect an extense blockading network against ruptures, but that forceful attempts to break a blockade are condemned to failure.

In any case, I hope that the following games may help you to see how most of the ideas Nimzowitsch left to us are modern and may appear in our practice. I will include some  games by Nimzowitsch and others by modern players. To understand them, bear in mind the basic idea:

RESTRAINT-BLOCKADE-DESTRUCTION.

W.: Berger (0)

B.: Nimzowitsch (1)

London 1927

1. c4, Nf6 2. Nc3, c5  3. g3, g6  4. Bg2, Bg7  5. d3, 0-0  6. Bd2 ,e6 7. Qc1, d5  8. Nh3, d4  9. Nd1, Na6  10. a3, Qe8  11. b3, e5  12. Nb2, Bg4  13. Ng5 , Rb8  14. b4, b6  15. b5, Nc7  16. a4, Bc8  17. a5, Bb7  18. f3, Ne6  19. a6, Ba8  20. h4, Nh5  21. Nxe6, Qxe6  22. g4, Nf6  23. Bh3, Qd6  24. Nd1, h5  25. g5, Nh7  26. Nf2, f6  27. gf6, Bxf6 28. Bg5, Bxg5  29. hg5, Rf4  3. Rg1, Rbf8  31. Bf1, Rh4  32. Qd2, Rh2  33. Rg2 Rxg2  34. Bxg2, e4  35. de4, Qg3  36. Kf1, Nxg5  37. Kg1, Rxf3  38. Qxg5 , Qxg5  39. ef3, Qe3  40. Rd1, Qb3  41. Rc1, g5  42. Kh2, Qe3  43. Rf1, Qe2  44. Nh3, d3  45. Nf2, d2  46. Kg1, Qxc4  47. Rd1, Qc1  48. Bh3, g4  49. fg4, Bxe4  50. gh5, Bf3   and Berger resigned.  

W.:  Hage (0)

B.: Nimzowitsch (1)

Arnstadt 1926  (Simuls)

1. d4, f5 2. e6, d6  3. Bd3, e5  4. de5, de5  5. Bb5, c6  6. Qxd8 ,Kxd8  7. Bc4, Bd6  8. Nf3, Nf6  9. Nc3, Ke7  10. a3, ,Rd8  11. Bd2, b5  12. Ba2, a5  13. 0-0, b4  14. Nb1, c5  15. Bc4, e4  16. Ng5 ,Ba6  17. Bxa6, Rxa6  18. ab4, ab4  19. Rxa6, Nxa6  20. c3, h6  21. Nh3, Ng4  22. g3, Ne5  23. Kg2, g5  24. Bc1, b3  25. Nd2, c4  26. Ng1, Nc5  27. Ne2, Rg8  28. Nd4, f4  29. Nf5, Ke6  30. Nxd6  f3  31. Kg1, Kxd6  32. Rd1, Ke6  33. Nb1, Ncd3  34. Na3, Kd5 35. Nb5, Rb8  36. Na3, Ra8  37. h3, Kc5  38. Kf1, Nc1, 39. Rc1, Nd3,  40. Rb1, Nxb2  41. Rxb2, Rxa3  42. Rb1, b2 /  0 – 1

W.: Nimzowitsch (1)

B.: Colle (0)

London 1927

1. d4, Nf6  2. Nf3, e6  3. c4, b6  4. g3, Bb7  5. Bg2, Bb4  6. Nc3, 0-0  7. 0-0, Bxc3  8. bc3  9. a4, a5  10. Ba3, Nbd7  11. Nd2, Bxg2  12. Kxg2, e5  13. e4, Re8  14. f3, Nf8  15. Rf2, Qd7  16. Nf1, Ng6  17. Bc1, Kh8  18. Ne3, Ng8  19. h4, Qc6  20. h5, N6e7  21. Qd3, Rf8  22. g4, g6  23. Bd2, gh5  24. Nf5, Nxf5  25. gf5, Nf6  26. d5, Qd7  27. Qe3, Rg8  28. Kh1, Qe7  29. Rh2, Rg7  30. Be1, Nd7  31. Rxh5, Rag8  32. Bf2, f6  33. Rh2, Rg5  34. Bh4, Rh5  35. Rg1, Qf8  36. Rg4, Qh6  37. Qxh6, Rxh6  38. Bf2, Rxh2  39. Kxh2, Rb8  40. Rg1, Nc5  41. Ra1, Kg7  42. Be3, Kf7  43. Ra2, Nd3  44. Rd2, Ne1  45. Kg3, Rg8  46. Kf2, Ng2  47. Bh6, Nf4  48. Bxf4, ef4  49. Rd1, Ke7  50. Rh1, Rg7  51. Rh4, c6  52. Rxf4, h5  53. Rh4, Rh7  54. Rh1, Kd7  55. Rg1, cd5  56. cd5, h4  57. Rg8, h3  58. Ra8, Rh6  59. Ra7, Kc8  60. Kg1, h2  61. Kh1, Rh3  62. Rf7, Rxf3  63. Rxf6, Kd7  64. Rf7, Ke8  65. Rb7, Rxc3  66. Rxb6, Ke7  67. Rb7 ,Kf8  68. Ra7, Rc4  69. Rxa5, Rxe4  70. Ra7, Rf4  71. a5, Rxf5  72. a6, Rf1  73. Kxh2, Ra1  74. Ra8, Kg7  75. Kg3, Ra4  76. Kf3, Kf6  77. a7, Kg7  78. Ke3  and Colle resigned.

W.: M. Voroviov (1)

B.: A. Yusupov (0)

Irkutsk, 1985

1. e4, e5 2. Nf3, Nc6 3. d4, ed4 4. Nxd4, Nf6  5. Nc3, Bb4  6. Nxc6 ,bc6  7. Bd3, d5  8. e5 (The phase of restraint starts) …, Ng4  9. 0-0 ,Qh4  10. Bf4, Nh6  11. Ne2, Nf5  12. c3, Bc5  13. b4, Bb6  14. Qc2, Ne7  15. Bg3, Qh6  16. Kh1, 0-0  17. f4, f5  18. Bf2 ,Be6  19. Bc5! (now the process of establishing a blockade network) ,… Bxc5  20. b5 ,Kh8  2. Nd4, Rae8  22. Rab1, Bc8  23. Rf3, g5  24. Rh3, Qg7  25. Rg3!, g4  26. Re3, Qg6  27. Qf2, Ng8  28. h4! ,Bd7  29. g3, Ne7  30. Re2 ,Rb8  31. Reb2 ( final step: destruction) ,… Qg8  31. Rb7, Rfc8  32. Rb7, Rfc8  33. Ba6! ,Rxb7  34. Rxb7, Rb8  35. Qb2!, Rxb7  36. Qxb7 ,Qd8  37. Qxa7, Ng6  38. Bb7, Nxh4  39. Qa8!  Black resigned.

In positional/strategical games it is very interesting to study the game from the strategical point of view and then from the tactical one, tying to find the justification of every move.

When I was studying the games to include I realised the complexity of this strategical theme.  Trying to understand better the process and wanting to represent it, I devised the following description. What I am trying to depict is  how    POSITIONAL  PRESSURE  TURNS INTO TACTICAL RESOLUTION OF THE POSITION :

__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

THREATS  <=====> INITIATIVE ——-> RESTRAINT—–> BLOCKADE    ========> MORE SPACE/MOBILITY ————–>  ———->   DESTRUCTION.

The opponent breaks up under the pressure which creates:

1) Uncoordination of the pieces which are unable to prevent all the threats.

2) Ruptures impossible to stop so as to open up the position .

_____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

W.: K. Burger (0)

B.. E. Lobron (1)

New York, 1983

1. d4, Nf6  2. Nf3, e6  3. c4, c5  4. d5, ed5 5. cd5, d6  6. Nc3, g6  7. Bf4, a6  8. a4, Bg7  9. e4, 0-0  10. Be2, ,Bg4  11. 0-0, Bxf3  12. Bxf3 ,Qe7  13. Re1, Nbd7  14. Qc2, Ne8  15. Qd2, Nc7  16. Bg5, f6  17. Bh6, Bxh6  18. Qxh6, b5  19. b3, b4  20. Nd1, f5 21. Qd2, Ne5  22. Nb2, f4  23. Nd3, h5  24. Be2, ,Nxd3  25. Qxd3, Qe5  26. Qh3, Rf7  27. Rad, Kg7  28. Bc4, a5  29. Qd3, g5  30. f3, ,Kf6  31. Kf2, Rg8  32. Qb1, g4  33. Qa1, Rfg7  34. Bf1, Qxa1  35. Rxa1, Ke5  36. Rad1, Ne8  37. Ke2, Nf6  38. Kd3, c4  39. bc4, Nd7  40. Kc2, Nc5  and Burger resigned. An excelent example.

W.: J. Timman (0)

B.: A. Karpov (1)

Tilburg 1988

1.d4, Nf6  2. c4, e6  3. Nf3, b6  4. a3, Bb7  5. Nc3, d5  6. cd5, Nxd5  7. Qc2, Nxc3  8. bx3, Be7  9. e3, Qc8  10. Bb2, c5  1. Bb5, Bc6  12. Bd3, c4  13. Be2, Nd7  14. a4, a6  15. 0-0, 0-0  16. e4, b5  17. Ba3, Bxa3  18. Rxa3 , Qb7  19. Nd2, Nb6  20. a5, Nd7  21. f3, e5  22. d5, Qa7  23. Kh1, Bb7  24. Raa1, f5  25. Rad1, f4  26. g4, ,Rf6  27. Qb2, Re8  28. Rg1, Bc8  29. Rg2, Nf8  30. h4, Rh6  31. Rh2, Qe7  32. h5, g6  33. Qb4, Kg7  34. Rg1, Nd7  35. Qxe7, Rxe7  36. hg6, Rxh2,  37. Kxh2, Kxg6  38. Kh3, Nc5  39. Kh4, Rc7  40. Rb1, Nb7  41. Ra1, ,Nd6  42. Nb1, R7  43. Na3, Kf6  44. Rg1 N7  45. Kh3, h5 / and Timman resigned. Another superb example.

QuestChess.

Written by QChess

November 8, 2012 at 8:30 am

Games to Replay in these Grey Fall Days

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In the next posts I am going to include some studies for you to solve. I have chosen those with very short solutions (4-5 moves). Have a try at all of them to sharpen your tactical skills. I will give the solution. You will have to check the possible variations, etc.

(Now it would be interesting to know whether you prefer these studies or those “mate in three moves” problems… So drop a line if you feel like!)

*******************

On the other hand, I have prepared new interesting posts for the next weeks. I hope you enjoy them.

 

*********************************************************************

W.:  M. Rohde  (1)

B: J. Whitehead (0)

Estes Park (USA), 1987

1. e4 , c5  2. Nf3, Nc6  3. d4, cd4  4. Nd4: , Nf6  5. Nc3, d6  6. Be3, Ng4  7. Bg5 , Qb6  8. Bb5, e5  9. Nd5,  Qd4:  10. Qd4: , ed4  11. Nc7, Kd7  12. Na8: ,h6  13. Bd2 , Kd8  14. a4, Bd7  15. a5 , Kc8  16. 0-0, Kb8  17. Nb6! ,ab6  18. ab6 , Nce5  19. Be2, g5  20. Ra5 , Nc6  21. Ra4, Be7  22. Rfa1, Kc8  23. Rd4:!, Nge5  24. Ra8, Nb8  25. Bb4, Bc6  26. Bd6:, Bd6:  27. Rd6: , Be4:  28. c4 , g4  29. b4 ,h5  30. Ra5 , Nec6  31. Rh5:, Rh5: 32. Bg4: Rf5  33. f3, Bc2  34. Rf6 , Nd4  35. Rf7: , Nd7  36. Bf5: ,Bf5: 37. c5, Kd8  38.h4, Ke8  39. Rg7 ,Kf8  40. Rg5, Ne5 41.Rh5, Ke7  42. Kf2, Kf6  43. Rh6, Ke7  44. Rd6, Nd3  45. Kf1, Nb5  46. Rd5, Ke6 47. c6! ,Nb4:  48. cb7, Nc6  49. Rd8! , Nd6  50. Rc8! , Bd3  51. Kf2, Ba6   52. Rc6: Bb7:  53. Rc7 Black resigned.

W.: Winsnes (1)

B.: Krasenkov (0)

Rilton Cup , Stockholm ,1989

1. e4 , e5  2. Nf3, Nf6  3. Bb5, a6  4. Ba4,  Nf6 5. 0-0, Nxe4 6. d4, b5  7. Bb3 , d5  8.de5 , Be6  9. Be3 (an old move deviating from the normal paths), Nc5  10. Nc3, Nxb3  11. cb3!, Be7  12. Rc1, Qd7  13. Qd2, 0-0  14. Rfd1, Rad8  15. Bg5, d4  16. Ne4, Bd5  17. Qf4 , Bxg5  18. Nfxg5, Qe7  19. Rxc6!, Bxc6  20. Nf6!, gf6  21. Nxh7!, Kxh7  22. Qh4, Kg7  23. Qg4, Kh8  24. Rd3, Be4  25. Rh3 ,Bh7  26. Qf5 and Krasenkov resigned.

W.: R. Tishbierek (1)

B.: R. Knaak (0)

Ellenburg, 1984

1. e4, e6 2. d4, d5  3. Nd2, c5  4. ed5, ed5  5. N1f3, Nf6  6. Be2, Nbd7  7. 0-0, Be7  8. b3, 0-0  9. Bb2, Bd6?!  10. c4, cd4  11. cd5, Nxd5  12. Ne4!, Bc7  13. Qxd4, N7f6  14. Nxf6, Qxf6  15. Qd2 , Qf5  16. g3, Rd8  17. Nh4, Qh3  18.  Qg5, f6  19. Qh5, Be6  20. Bd3, h6  21. Qg6, Nf4  22. Qh7, Kf8  23. Bxf6 gf6  24. Qxh6, Kg8  25.Bh7, Kf7  26. Bg6, Nxg6  27. Qxg6, Kf8  28. Qxf6,  Kg8  29. Rfe1, Re8  30. Qg6, Kh8  31.Re4, Bd7  32. Qf7!  and Knaak resigned. 

W.: M. Tal (1)

B.: Shavalov (0)

Jurmala, 1985

1.d4, d5  2. Nf3, Nf6  3. c4, c6  4. Qb3, dc4  5. Qxc4, Bf5  6. g3, e6  7. Bg2, Nbd7  8. Nc3, Be7  9. 0-0, 0-0  10. e3, Rc8  11. Qe2, c5  12. e4, Bg4  13. dc5, Nxc5   14. Rd1, Qb6  15. h3, Bh4  16. g4, Bg6  17. Ne5 ,Rfd8  18. Be3, Qb4  19. Nxg6 , hg6  20. e5, Ne8  21. Nb5, a6  22. Nd4, Na4  23. Rd2, Rc7  24. a3, Qa5  25. Qd1!, Nb6  26. Nxe6!, fe6  27. Rxd8, Bxd8  28. Qxd8, Kf8  29. Rd1, Nc4 30. b4, Qa4  31.Bc5, Kg8  32. f4, b6  33. Bf2 ,Rf7  34. Rd4,Nxa3  35. Rd6!, Rxf4  36. Rxe6, Rf8  37. Bxb6, Nc4  38. Rxe8! , Rxe8  39. Bd5 and Shavalov resigned.

(Note: I publish a lot of games played in the 80’s,the 70’s, etc.of the 20th century. This is because I learnt Chess with those games, they were played before the computer era, and they are nearly forgotten. Today you can follow tournamentslive thanks to the Internet. In those years, you have to wait till chess magazines published them… We annot compare players from different times, but to me, the Chess played from the 60’s throughout the 90’s is of superb quality, even more than today’s games…)

 

 

QuestChess.

Written by QChess

September 27, 2012 at 6:20 am

Posted in Chess games, Studies

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