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A Contribution by Bobby Fischer.

with 2 comments

In a previous post I wrote about the clash between Queen vs. Rook+Rook and I even said that two pieces seemed stronger than one (depending on concrete details, of course). The great Bobby Fischer provoked in no less than five of his games the fight between his Q and his opponents’ R+R. BUT always a Pawn up for Bobby (even though sometimes he had doubled Pawns too , which apparently seemed a handicap.) This is a difficult struggle of heterogeneous forces and the key is to maintain the material advantage and the creation of threats one move after another without respite, with the advance of the Pawns on the one hand and the activity of the Queen on the other. This requires deep intuition and great calculation skills. Any mistake and the two Rooks would bounce back stopping the threats and creating deadly ones on their own because they are “two against one”. So the side with the Queen must handle the concept of “timing” with absolute dexterity. You can see how Fischer managed to do it. The games are wonderful.

The first position is from Fischer – Seidman, US.Ch. Ch. 1960

Fischer -Seidman

The game continued: 24. Re8, Qxe8  25. Bxe8, Rxe8  26. h3, b4  27. cxb4, Rxb/ 28. Qxf6, Kg8  29. Qg5, Kh8  30. Qf4, Ra4  31. Qf7, Rg8  32. Qc7, Ra2  33. Qe5, Rg7  34. g4, h6  35. Qb8, Rg8  36. c7! , 1-0

 *********************************************************************

The following position was from Fischer – D. Byrne, Bay City Open, 1963. (Bobby has just played 24. Rhe1)

Fischer-. D.Byrne

The game continued: 24…, Qxe1/ 25. Rxe1 Rxe1 26. Kb2, Rh1  27. Qf4 , Rf8  28. c4, f6/ 29. c5, Rh5 30.Qc7, Rxh6  31. Qxb7, Rh5 32. c6, Re5  33. c7, Re-e8 34.Kb3, g5  35. Ka4 ,Ra8  36. c4, h5  37. c5, h4  38. Kb5, Kh8 39. a4, Kg8 40. Kb6, f5  41. Qd5, Kg7  42. Kb7, Kg6  43. Qe6, Kg7  44. Qe7, Kg6  45. f4! , gxf4  46. Qh4,  1-0

*********************************************************************

Fischer had repeated the theme in the game he played vs. Bisguier in the Stockholm Interzonal, 1962, beating his opponent in 54 moves.

Fischer game

Bisguier-Fischer, Stockholm 1962:

24…Rxf2  25. Qxf2, Rxf2  26. Rxf2, g4  27. Bc1, Qb5  28. Bf4, Qd3  29. Rd2, Qg6  30. Ne1, h5  31. Ng2, Kh7  32. Re1, Nd8  33. Nh4, Qe8  34. h3, gh  35. Kh2, Nf7  36. Kh3, Bh6  37. Rc2, Qg8  38. Rf1, Qg4  39. Kh2, Ng5  40. Bg5, Bg5 41. Nf3, Be3  42. Re2, Bh6  43. Ref2, Kg8  44. Nh4, Qd4  45. Rf7, Qg4  46. R1f3, Qg5  47. R3f4, d4  48. Nf3, Qg6  49. Nh4, Qf7  50. Rf7, Kf7  51. Kg2, d3  52. Kf2, Bg7  53. Nf3, Kg6  54. Ke3, Kf5 /  0-1

  *********************************************************************

The following position corresponds to the game Portisch- Fischer, Santa Monica (USA), 1966:

Portisch-Fischer

Fischer played: 11…., Qd7 12. Ba3, Re8 13. Bd3, f5/ 14. Qxa8, Nc6  15. Qxe8, Qxe8 16. 0-0, Na5 17. Rae1, Bxc4 18. Bxc4, Nxc4 19. Bc1, c5  20. dxc5, bxc5  21. Bf4, h6  22. Re2, g5  23.Be5?, Qd8  24. Rfe1, Kf7  25. h3, f4  26. Kh2, a6  27. Re4, Qd5  28. h4, Ne3  29. R1xe3 ,fxe3  30. Rxe3, Qxa2  31. Rf3, Ke8/ 32. Bg7, Qc4, 33. hxg5, hxg5  34. Rf8, Kd7  35. Ra8, Kc6 / 0-1

 ********************************************************************

And the last example took place a year before the previous one, in the game Fischer- Bilek ,Havana 1965:

1. e4, e6  2. d4, d5  3. Nc3, Nf6  4. Bg5, dxe4  5. Nxe4, Nbd7  6. Nf3, Be7  7. Nxf6, Bxf6  8. h4, h6  9. Bxf6, Qxf6  10. Qd2, 0-0  11. 0-0-0, b6  12. Bb5, Qe7  13. Rh3, Bb7  14. Rg3, Kh8  15. Bd7, Bxf3  16. gxf3, Qxd7  17. Rdg1, f6 (D)

Fischer Bilek

18. Rxg7, Qxg7  19. Rxg7, Kxg7  20. Qf4, Rac8  21. h5, ,c5  22. Qg4, Kf7  23. Qg6, Ke7  24. dxc5, Rxc5  25. Qxh6, Rg5  26. b3, e5  27. Kb2, Rf7  28. a4, Ke6  29. Qh8, Re7  30. h6, Kf7  31. Qh7, Kf8  32. Qd3, Kf7  33. h7, Rh5  34. Qd5, Re6  35. f4, f5  36. fxe5, Rxh7  37. Qd7, Re7  38. Qxf5, Ke8  39. f4, Kd8  40. e6 , 1-0  An impressive  game.

QChess.

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Written by QChess

February 1, 2014 at 7:24 am

Posted in CHESS, Chess games, Fischer

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2 Responses

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  1. Reblogged this on Chess Musings and commented:
    A very useful lesson on positions involving a queen versus two rooks.

    chessmusings

    March 2, 2014 at 1:40 am

    • Dear Chessmusings,
      Thank you very much for reblogging this post and you interest. I am resting for a while waiting for inspiration to come. It’s better to write only when one has interesting things to say.
      Yours,
      QChess

      QChess

      March 2, 2014 at 7:28 am


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